Finding Trump with Neural Networks

By James Allen-Robertson (This post originally appeared on Medium)

When the President tweets, how do we know who is really behind the keyboard? With a trained Neural Network, we might be able to find out.

Prior to March 2018 Donald Trump had been using an unauthorised personal Android phone in his role as POTUS. Whilst a source of anxiety for his Staff, for journalists and researchers this was particularly useful for distinguishing the words of the President himself, from those of the White House Staff. With Twitter’s API — the gateway Twitter makes available for anyone wanting to utilise their data — providing information on the ‘source’ for each Tweet, it became a fair assumption that if the ‘source’ was Android, it was pure Trump.

However as you can see from the following chart that maps the month of the tweet (on the x axis) by the frequency of tweeting (on the y axis), around March 2017 activity from Android drops off, and iPhone activity picks up.

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International Human Rights News: Weekly Roundup

By  Besir OzbekAgathe ArtusÖvünç GüneşFrancesca Fazio

Each week students at the University of Essex Human Rights Centre prepare an overview of the past week’s human rights related news stories from around the world.

International

UNICEF urges all countries to provide ‘Super Dads’ with paid leave – UN News

The High Commissioner is proud of the UN Human Rights Office in 2017 – OHCHR

Discrimination Has No Role in the World Cup – Human Rights Watch

‘Much more’ can be done to raise awareness about the plight of persons with albinism: UN chief – UN News

The Most Inspiring Photos of 2018 Pride Marches Around the World – Global Citizen

At least 2.5 million migrants were smuggled in 2016, first UN global study shows – UN News

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Deconstructing the meaning of Art: a thing or a right?

By Luis F. Yanes

This blog originally appeared on SLSA Blog.

From Aristotle to contemporary thinkers, many have suggested that there is a human instinct to produce and to enjoy artistic experiences or expressions. But how to define such natural instinct? When we really enjoy something – something we believe to be well done and particularly beautiful – like a car, a house, a table, or even a person, we tend to refer it as ‘a piece of art’, highlighting a distinct characteristic that it has from everything else. Is art then beauty?

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International Human Rights News: Weekly Roundup

By Ayushi Kalyan , Nina Giraudel, Sweekruthi Keshavamurthy,  Manon Clayette

Each week students at the University of Essex Human Rights Centre prepare an overview of the past week’s human rights related news stories from around the world.

International

World must unite against ‘preventable tragedy’ of ocean pollution: UN chief – UN News

Global Citizen Launches New Campaign for Gender Equality Because #SheIsEqual – Global Citizen

International Summit: Travel and tourism sector acts to protect children across the industry – UNICEF News

Malala Calls on G7 Leaders to Commit to Girls’ Education – Global Citizen

Hunger surges amid deadly conflicts, poor weather conditions in many countries – UN agriculture agency – UN News

Fathers are one of the best, yet most underutilized child development resources – UNICEF – UNICEF News

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International Human Rights News: Weekly Roundup

By  Besir OzbekAgathe ArtusÖvünç GüneşFrancesca Fazio

Each week students at the University of Essex Human Rights Centre prepare an overview of the past week’s human rights related news stories from around the world.

International

The UN Wants to Create a Treaty to End Workplace Harassment – Global Citizen

‘Positive’ community building helps combat hate online: UN counter-terrorism chair – UN News

More Than Half the World’s Children Face Poverty, Conflict, or Discrimination – Global Citizen

World Environment Day: Joint Statement by UN Environment and Special Rapporteur on human rights and the environment – OHCHR

Gender Inequality Could Be Costing the World $160 Trillion – Global Citizen

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Locating Human Rights in the Critical Analysis of Algorithmic Decision-Making: A Brief Commentary on the Science and Technology Committee Report on Algorithms in Decision-Making

By Vivian Ng

The House of Commons Science and Technology Committee recently released the Fourth Report of Session 2017-2019 on ‘Algorithms in decision-making’. The release of the Committee’s findings and recommendations for the government is particularly timely, following recent revelations regarding Cambridge Analytica and Facebook and the increasing recognition that these issues extend far wider. This post will unpack how human rights have featured in the Committee’s analysis, and argues that human rights should underpin and center the understanding of how algorithms affect individuals and groups in society, as well as the responses to address the risks and challenges.

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International Human Rights News: Weekly Roundup

By Ayushi Kalyan , Nina Giraudel, Sweekruthi Keshavamurthy,  Manon Clayette

Each week students at the University of Essex Human Rights Centre prepare an overview of the past week’s human rights related news stories from around the world.

International

HIV/AIDS still impacting work and costing billions in lost earnings – new UN agency report – UN News

UN chief launches new disarmament agenda ‘to secure our world and our future’ – UN News

Hitting toughest climate target will save world $30tn in damages, analysis shows – The Guardian

UN Passes Historic Resolution to Tackle Link Between Conflict and Hunger – Global Citizen

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Four ways your Google searches and social media affect your opportunities in life

By Lorna McGregor, Daragh Murray, and Vivian Ng

This blog originally appeared on The Conversation

Whether or not you realise or consent to it, big data can affect you and how you live your life. The data we create when using social media, browsing the internet and wearing fitness trackers are all collected, categorised and used by businesses and the state to create profiles of us. These profiles are then used to target advertisements for products and services to those most likely to buy them, or to inform government decisions.

Big data enable states and companies to access, combine and analyse our information and build revealing – but incomplete and potentially inaccurate – profiles of our lives. They do so by identifying correlations and patterns in data about us, and people with similar profiles to us, to make predictions about what we might do.

But just because big data analytics are based on algorithms and statistics, does not mean that they are accurate, neutral or inherently objective. And while big data may provide insights about group behaviour, these are not necessarily a reliable way to determine individual behaviour. In fact, these methods can open the door to discrimination and threaten people’s human rights – they could even be working against you. Here are four examples where big data analytics can lead to injustice.

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International Human Rights News: Weekly Roundup

Each week students at the University of Essex Human Rights Centre prepare an overview of the past week’s human rights related news stories from around the world.

International

Key UN forum in Asia-Pacific sets its sights on combatting inequality UN News

UN health agency aims to save millions of lives by ‘elimination’ of trans-fatty acids from global food chain – UN News

Jobs in the green economy will ‘more than offset’ losses in traditional industry by 2030 – UN labour agency – UN News

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